Friends of MrWatchMaster

Kari Voutilainen

kari-portrait
Kari Voutilainen

Kari Voutilainen has a passionate interest in horology spanning forty years. He completed his initial watchmaker’s training at the world renowned watchmaking school of Tapiola in Finland.

He came to Switzerland in 1988 to attend the International Watchmaking School WOSTEP, 1990 he started to work in Switzerland in Parmigiani until 1999 fabricating complicated unique pieces and making restorations.

He taught for the next three years at the WOSTEP, heading the department of complicated watchmaking.

Alongside his professional work, Kari Voutilainen completed his first pocket tourbillon in 1994. After this unique piece he has made several unique bespoke pieces to customers during his free time 1994 and 2002.

He started his independent workshop at 2002; ten years later he made his in-house movement Vingt-8 with direct impulse Voutilainen escapement.

vingt-8
Vingt-8 in rose gold

As with all entirely handmade watches, their number will remain limited; each one is crafted according to specific requirements and has its own individual and personal qualities.

Today the workshop has 21 people working; movements are fabricated entirely in house.

2014 Kari bought a dial factory, in which his dials are finished and he is also fabricating dials to other watch makers.

Read our exclusive interview with Kari here

Robert Loomes

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Robert Loomes FBHI

Robert Loomes is an English Watchmaker with a long and fiercely proud reputation for bringing out the best of British horology.

Robert grew up immersed in the family business and, almost inevitably, ended up working in the business. His Father, Brian, a hugely well respected clock dealer and author based in the Yorkshire Dales, allowed Robert to spend his days off in the workshops of some of the best, and kindest, restorers in the north of England. At the age of twenty four Robert started his own restoration business in the Lincolnshire market town of Stamford.

Robert finally qualified as a Member of the British Horological Institute (BHI) in 2000 and spent six years as a volunteer director there, ending up as director for Education. He is currently the vice-chairman of the BHI.

Meanwhile, having made a couple of wristwatches out of imported Swiss bits for fun, Loomes decided to make a batch of cheap automatic watches. The first hundred sold in a matter of weeks and it was clear the business was changing direction. It was then that Robert decided to develop an all-British-made watch.

This was quickly developed around a stock of old Smiths movements. The staff set to on dialmaking, hand production, case finishing, and later interesting skills like enameling. We are the only English firm who can hand fire glass enamel dials in our workshops – made in exactly the same way as dials were made 250 years ago. This work went on to produce the Robin range of watches, still selling well today.

Meanwhile, Robert hired in special expertise to build the Loomes milling machine. It took two years to build but, when completed in August 2013, it is able to machine almost all the components needed for movement manufacture. The mainplate, cocks and bridges are all machined on it.

red-robin
Red Robin in rose gold

All the components are slotting into place and Loomes are about to unveil their own movement, producing a watch where every single component, even jewels, screws and springs, is made in England. It is, they believe, the only entirely English-manufactured watch.

When not playing with watches, Robert and Robina enjoy spending as much time as possible outdoors. Robina rides horses and Robert is well known for using his Thames river skiff – a larger rowing boat designed to carry passengers. Moored outside the shop and called “the escapement”, it is used to escape the office and gently drift down the river and out into open countryside.

Read our exclusive interview with Robert here

Peter Speake-Marin

Peter Speake-Marin
Peter Speake-Marin

Peter Speake-Marin was born Peter Neville Speake in 1968 in Essex, England, to an English mother and Welsh father. When Peter reached the end of his secondary school education, he originally had the intention of entering the world of jewellery. However, after a visit to a kindly careers teacher, Peter entered the world of watchmaking. He began his horological education at Hackney Technical College in London in 1985 and then continued his studies at WOSTEP, the prestigious Swiss watchmaking school in Neuchâtel.

Having completed the WOSTEP high-end complications course, Peter returned to England. He was eventually employed by Somlo Antiques then based in the Piccadilly arcade, London where he was tasked with establishing the watch restoration department of this prestigious antiques house.

During seven years at Somlo, Peter had the privilege of restoring antique watches made by many of the great historical masters and brands, such as pieces by Arnold, Frodsham and Nielson, original Breguets and Patek Philippes – from the dawn of watchmaking through to the 1950s.

Through this experience, Peter learnt how past masters had found their watchmaking solutions and their diverse ways of making watches, and he fell in love with this intoxicating combination of history, art and mechanics.

In 1996, he married, changing his name from Speake to Speake-Marin, before he and his wife moved to Le Locle, Switzerland where he worked for Renaud & Papi to help develop and build high-end complications as well as train young watchmakers.

In his spare time, Peter began acquiring his own machinery and constructed by hand a tourbillon pocket watch with twin power trains, which later became known as the “Foundation Watch”– the foundation stone for his future work – and helped him earn coveted membership of the prestigious Académie Horlogère des Créateurs Indépendants (AHCI).

The Foundation Pocket Watch that influenced Speake-Marin
The Foundation Pocket Watch that influenced Speake-Marin

In the “Foundation Watch”, Peter laid down his style and philosophy while establishing his first independent workshop at the beginning of the millennium on the picturesque Lake Geneva between Geneva and Lausanne.

The first wristwatch to leave his workshop at the end of 2003 took its cues from the Foundation Watch. Peter named its distinctive case “The Piccadilly” after the time he spent at Somlo in Piccadilly and the major influence that this period of his career had on his watchmaking outlook.

Velsheda Rum
Velsheda Rum

As an independent, he has collaborated as a watchmaker designer and consultant with many different companies including Harry Winston, MB&F and Maîtres du Temps. Since the beginning of 2008 he has channelled his efforts exclusively into Speake-Marin.

With all Speake-Marin watches there is a tangible link to classical watchmaking but with contemporary unique style and design. Peter Speake-Marin’s timepieces are very much a representation of himself as a watchmaker, reinventing horology in his own way.

Diamond Face To Face
Diamond Face To Face

There are very few modern watchmakers and brands that have created such an original style, adhered to such an underlying philosophy of constant excellence, beauty and longevity of design and aesthetics, to create timepieces that will endure.

Read our exclusive interview with Peter here

Dr John C Taylor OBE

Dr John C Taylor OBE

Dr John C Taylor OBE is a world-renowned inventor and entrepreneur perhaps best known for designing thermostat systems. After 20 years working for the family business Otter Controls, Dr Taylor left to build his own company Strix Ltd which received four Queen’s Awards. He is an eminent horologist, with a renowned collection of early English clocks and Watches.

Edward East 1635 Verge Watch is part of Dr Taylor’s collection

Dr Taylor designed the Chronophage clocks, which have been exhibited in a number of museums. The one on the outer wall of the Taylor Library at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge has become a major tourist attraction.

Dr Taylor’s ‘favourite’: David Ramsay – King James I Watch, made in 1618

In 2011, Dr Taylor was made an OBE for services to business and horology.

Dr Taylor and the Corpus clock

Read our exclusive Collector’s World series featuring Dr John Taylor here

David Brailsford

David Brailsford in his Norwich workshop

David Brailsford is an accomplished entrepreneur with 20 years of experience in creating companies that thrive. He is also a renowned luxury timepiece consultant with expertise in locating and sourcing vintage pieces and selling them to select clients worldwide.

For the last few years, he has been providing a successful watch finder service, seeking out rare vintage watches and advising on their investment potential. His watch industry expertise is unparalleled, and he has developed a network of global contacts, including leading journalists, watchmakers and collectors.

His passion for watchmaking has led to founding the British luxury watch brand Garrick.

Garrick’s Portsmouth watch was inspired by old maritime instruments

Garrick builds handcrafted timepieces in their own workshops in Norwich. David says that building an exclusive international watch brand over a period of 18 months is probably his greatest achievement. He’s learnt everything there is to know about engineering, design, PR and watchmaking.

Read our exclusive Collector’s World series featuring David Brailsford here

Paul Maudsley

Paul Maudsley is the International Watch Specialist at Phillips Auctioneers

Paul Maudsley is the International Specialist, Director, Watches Department at Phillips. He has over 17 years of experience of watch auctions having transformed the UK watches auction market and handled over 30,000 watches in his career so far.

A fine ‘Maudsley’ watch

A collector of watches from an early age, Paul has developed a love and broad knowledge of horology across all areas of watches and wristwatches. Organising watch auctions in three continents, Paul has been responsible for sourcing some of the finest quality timepieces in the world.

One of Paul’s Rolex Oyster Chronographs

With a well known passion for Rolex Sports watches, he has gained a great knowledge of the many different models and variations produced and has achieved numerous record prices for these at auction.

Read our exclusive Collector’s World series featuring Paul Maudsley here

Dr James Nye

Dr James Nye

Dr Nye has been involved in clocks since the age of fourteen, when he was put in charge of a Gents master-clock system at his school in Sussex. This sparked an abiding interest in electric timekeeping.

Following graduation from Balliol College, Oxford, James entered a career in finance and the energy sector. Retiring from commerce, he completed a PhD in financial history at King’s College, London, where he holds a visiting fellowship. His thesis included case studies of Victorian and Edwardian electric clock companies.

Throughout his career, James has assembled a wide-ranging collection of electric time artefacts enjoyed by many visiting specialists and enthusiasts over the last twenty-five years. These are now housed at The Clockworks in London, a unique combination of museum, library, workshops and meeting space.

His continuing research tends to focus on nineteenth and twentieth century horology, and his most recent major publication was A Long Time in Making (OUP, 2014), the history of the Smiths Group.
James is chairman of the council of the AHS. He is a long-standing member of the BHI, a Life Member of the NAWCC, belongs to the Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Chronometrie as well as Chronometrophilia, and is also a liveryman and member of the court of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers.

Read our exclusive feature on Transparency in the Watch Market written by James here.

François-Paul Journe

François-Paul Journe at work

Master watchmaker, François-Paul Journe has been ‘inventing’ and ‘making’ watches for over 33 years. The full revelation of his vocation came in Paris where he completed his studies when training with his uncle, eminent antique watch and clock restorer located at the heart of Saint-Germain-des-Prés and a first-rate clientele entrusted him with the finest collections.

It was there François-Paul Journe thrilled to the discovery of the most striking achievements in the history of watchmaking. He experienced the privilege of entering the mechanical heart of some exceptional creations that were to set his own heart beating for years to come!

He designed and crafted ‘Mysterious’ or ‘Sympathique’ clocks, and subtle mechanisms for unique creations, in pursuing the research from which authenticity and technical innovations are respecting the ethics of these great masters. In 1985, François-Paul becomes the official restorer to the maintenance and renovation of the ancient clocks of the Arts et Métiers Museum in Paris.

F.P. Journe Manufacture

Increasing demand emanating from Switzerland led him to develop a Manufacture dedicated to building complicated movements and innovative calibres for various prestigious Swiss watch brands. He thereby placed his historical and technical knowledge as a watchmaking design-engineer in the service of industry. François-Paul draws on his historical knowledge and expertise to face the most daring horological challenges with passion, conceiving entirely new and innovative calibres with a timeless consistency.

At the crossroad between Arts and Haute Horology, benchmark among the most prestigious watch companies, the independent F.P.Journe Manufacture is a world in itself, embodying excellence, know-how and innovation, in the respect of the haute horology tradition from which François-Paul Journe is the guardian. F.P.Journe produces its movements in 18K rose Gold, a first in the watch world and unique signature of the brand. Signed with the label Invenit et Fecit- (invented and made), they guarantee an exclusive in-house calibre, entirely invented, constructed, and assembled in the Geneva workshops.

Read our exclusive interview with François-Paul here.

Christine Hutter

Christine Hutter, Founder & CEO of Moritz Grossmann

Christine Hutter completed her apprenticeship as a watchmaker in 1989, finishing ‘top of the class’ amongst her peers in Bavaria. She was then recruited by Wempe, Germany’s largest luxury watch retailer. Following this she moved to Maurice Lacroix and then to Glashütte – initially to Glashütter Uhrenbetrieb and finally to power brand A. Lange & Söhne. It was there that she acquired in-depth experience in marketing and communications, and created new distribution channels.

Tefnut Lady in white gold

Over time, she had a growing desire to establish her own watch manufacture. Christine discovered the rich heritage of ‘Moritz Grossmann’, a brand that had lain dormant for 120-years and with the help of her family, she acquired the rights to the highly respected Glashütte marque. The brand was named after Karl Moritz Grossmann, the 19th-century watchmaker who founded the German School of Watchmaking in Glashütte.

Moritz Grossmann was born in Dresden (1826)

After a few months, she rented an old shop premises in Glashütte, that is the centre of German watchmaking and set about crafting their own superb timepieces. The inspiration for their watches comes from the rich history of 19th century watchmaking and is summed up well by the Latin term ‘manu factum’ meaning ‘made by hand’ which remains at the heart of the Moritz Grossmann ateliers.

The beautiful Atum Skeleton watch

The new Manufacture based in Glashütte, opened in June 2013. All employees are encouraged to apply their personal talents to the horological masterpiece that bears the prestigious Moritz Grossmann Glashütte brand name.

Moritz Grossmann manufacture in Glashütte

Read our exclusive interview with Christine here.

Maximilian Büsser

Max has a Master’s degree in Micro-Technology Engineering

Looking at Maximilian Büsser’s life and career to date, it becomes evident that MB&F is a natural progression for his innate entrepreneurial spirit.

Graduating in Lausanne with a Master’s degree in Micro-Technology Engineering, Max’s love for high-end horology was strongly imprinted by his first employer, Jaeger-LeCoultre. He spent seven years in their senior management team during an exciting period of change and growth.

Max was appointed managing director of Harry Winston Rare Timepieces in 1998 – he was just 31. During his seven years there he transformed the company into a well-respected haute horlogerie brand. Working with talented independent watchmakers on the innovative and revolutionary Opus series of timepieces gave him greatest satisfaction and planted the seed for developing that concept further still.

Max founded MB&F in 2005

In 2005 the desire to allow his creativity and energy full reign saw Max resign from Harry Winston to form his creative ideal: MB&F. With his new company, Maximilian Büsser has full creative liberty to indulge in his passion for working with the most talented independent horological professionals – pushing the limits of horology into a new dimension.

A wonderful mosaic of all the Friends of MB&F

Read our exclusive interview with Max here.

NAWCC

The National Watch and Clock Museum in Columbia PA

It is not just people who we consider as ‘Friends’, but organisations too! So we are delighted to announce that the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors (NAWCC) head-quartered in Columbia, Pennsylvania, United States of America are now officially our ‘Friends’.

Founded in 1943, the NAWCC has since grown into a wide-ranging collectors organisation with members in the USA and 50 other countries. Members participate in over 150 local and special interest chapters in North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. The NAWCC operates the National Watch and Clock Museum, our world-reknowned Library and Research Center, and an extensive publishing program. The NAWCC also hosts an annual convention, sponsors an annual symposium, and numerous regional meetings throughout the year.

Stephen Forsey

Stephen Forsey

Stephen Forsey grew up in St Albans, England, where he was inspired by his father’s passion for mechanics and engineering. From 1987 to 1992 he specialised in antique clock restoration and became head of Watch Restoration at Asprey’s in London. Between 1988 to 1990 Forsey attended two five-month courses at the WOSTEP watchmaking school in Neuchâtel and in 1992 joined Robert Greubel’s team at Renaud & Papi SA (now Audemars Piguet Renaud & Papi SA), developing complicated watch movements.

In 1999, he left to work independently and in 2001 he co-founded CompliTime with Robert Greubel. They began working on a new generation of tourbillon specifically designed to improve the timekeeping of the mechanical watch. Four years later they unveiled “Greubel Forsey” and stunned horological aficionados with their innovative Double Tourbillon 30°, a timepiece clearly demonstrating their twin goals of innovation and excellence.

Close Up: The incredible Greubel Forsey Grande Sonnerie

Robert and Stephen continue to build on their deep traditional knowledge gained with four decades of combined experience in high-end complicated timepieces, by inventing and developing technically valid horological complications to rigorous aesthetic principles.

Read our exclusive interview with Stephen here.

Anthony de Haas

Anthony de Haas (Courtesy of A.Lange & Söhne 2017 – Photo: Ben Gierig)

Anthony de Hass is Director of Product Development at A. Lange & Söhne. A native Dutchman, de Haas began his watchmaking career at IWC, mainly due to him being a fan of the famous brand. He secured the job after his impressive performance in the ‘bench test’ that resulted in him taking apart, cleaning, re-assembling and regulating an ETA 2892 movement in less that half the time it took their own master watchmakers!

Work of Art: Lange’s Zeitwerk Striking Time Movement

After two and a half years he joined the ‘watch supplier of complications’, Renaud & Papi and gained experience in creating ‘super’ complications, including minute repeaters and grande sonneries. During his six-year tenure with the firm, he worked for such famed Renaud & Papi watchmakers as Stephen Forsey, Peter Speake-Marin and Robert Greubel.

Classic Beauty: Lange’s 1815 Chronograph with the stopwatch function

In 2004, he was introduced to a client, Fabian Krone that just happened to be the CEO of A. Lange & Söhne. It was de Haas, that guided him during his ‘tour’ as he was fluent in German, and obviously impressed. Soon afterwards he was invited to join the Glashütte firm as Director of Product Development.

Read our exclusive interview with Tony here.

David Walter

David Walter with his double pendulum clock. (Courtesy of David Walter Timepieces)

David has been fascinated with clocks and watches from an early age and after completing many years of training and working with prestigious companies in London and Europe, his sights were set beyond simply repairing modern factory made watches.

When he started his clock and watch making company in 1980, he was already convinced that the making of new clocks matching or bettering the best ever made required creative emotion which arises from a combination of daring and authenticity.

David is the first person to successfully recreate the Woodward Free pendulum clock, W5 in 2006 followed by an improved edition of Breguet No.3671 Double Pendulum clock in 2010 and further development in 2012 added the complications of Daniels Perpetual calendar with retrograde date and sunrise/sunset indications.

These amazing achievements firmly place David as one of the greatest clockmakers ever to have lived and the greatest living clockmaker. Also he is the only clockmaker to have made both versions of double pendulum clocks, namely, The Free Pendulum (D)W5 and the Double Pendulum Resonance Clock.

Read our exclusive interview with David here.

Christophe Claret

Master Watchmaker: Christophe Claret (Courtesy of Christophe Claret)

There was nothing to suggest that the young Christophe Claret would eventually make the cycle of time his own. It was only after a chance visit to a watchmaker-restorer at the age of 14 that the possibility presented itself. From that point on, the mechanics of time would grow to become his passion. At just 19 years of age, he graduated from the Geneva Watchmaking School, continuing his education with the master-watchmaker Roger Dubuis who, in taking him under his wing, passed on the secrets of restoration and the mysteries of complex horological mechanisms.

Upon returning to his native city of Lyon, Christophe set up his first horological workshop in the family home. He decided to specialise in restoring antique timepieces, perfecting his finishing techniques and crafting open-work or ‘skeletonised’ watches.

A year of revelation – 1987: during his first visit to the Baselworld, Christophe met a man who would alter the course of his life. Rolf Schnyder, a Swiss industrialist who had just acquired the Ulysse Nardin brand, placed an order with Mr Claret for twenty minute repeater movements with San Marco jacquemarts. It provided the impetus he needed and two years later Mr Claret founded his first company, which was soon followed by another, ‘Manufacture Claret’.

The Current Manufacture Claret (Courtesy of Christophe Claret)

Within a decade, the name Christophe Claret became a benchmark in the field of complicated movements. Following on from Ulysse Nardin, seventeen other prestigious customers, including Franck Muller, deGrisogono, Girard-Perregaux, Jean Dunand and Harry Winston, turned to him to develop their most complex calibers. Christophe therefore decided to establish his company within a setting worthy of his reputation and his ambitions. In 1999, he acquired the Manoir du Soleil d’Or, a venerable mansion on the hills overlooking the nearby town of Le Locle, a stone’s throw from the Musée d’Horlogerie des Monts. There he set up his workshops, breathing new life into the residence formerly owned by the watchmaker Urban Jürgensen.

From 2002 to 2008, Manufacture Claret expanded its workshops. Today, operating at the cutting edge of technology and expertise, it employs almost a hundred highly-qualified experts in over thirty separate disciplines.

At the Cutting Edge (Courtesy of Christophe Claret)

While continuing to design exceptional movements for the most prestigious brands, Christophe Claret also produces watches bearing his own name, often one-of-a-kind creations commissioned by collectors won over by Mr Claret’s superlative horological mastery. Initially a low-key activity, his Christophe Claret branded pieces gained a higher profile in 2009 when he created the DualTow to celebrate the Manufacture’s 20th anniversary. This mechanical distillation of all of the watchmaker’s talent unlocked a freedom to create which resulted in highly complex, exclusive pieces.

Complicated by Design (Courtesy of Christophe Claret)

The Christophe Claret brand now belongs to the extremely exclusive circle of independent Haute Horlogerie brands that design, develop and produce their watches entirely in-house. An exceptional location at the heart Swiss watchmaking, placing it firmly at the forefront of horological innovation.

Read our exclusive interview with Christophe here

Konstantin Chaykin

Master Watchmaker: Konstantin Chaykin (Courtesy of Konstantin Chaykin)

Konstantin Chaykin is a well-known Russian watchmaker, inventor (more than 60 patents for inventions in the field of watchmaking). He was born in Russia in 1975, and in 2003 he made his first clock.

Attention to Detail: The Back of the Brilliant Lunokhod Watch (Courtesy of Konstantin Chaykin)

He is the only Russian member of the International Academy of Independent Watchmakers. He is a creator of the most complicated clock which was ever made in Russia (26 different indicators of horological and astronomical values).

Konstantin’s Masterpiece: The Stunning Computus Easter Clock (Courtesy of Konstantin Chaykin)

The timepieces by Konstantin Chaykin have repeatedly become laureates of prestigious Russian and international competitions. Konstantin annually takes part in the largest international watch exhibition Baselworld, and his watches regularly are among the best.

The Extraordinary Cinema Watch (Courtesy of Konstantin Chaykin)

Read our exclusive interview with Konstantin here