MB&F, the world’s first ever horological concept laboratory has teamed up once again with high-end clockmaker L’Epée for their latest creation, Grant, a transforming robotic ‘Horological Machine’

Having good friends is extremely important to Maximilian Büsser. As the founder of MB&F (Maximilian Büsser & Friends) he has created an artistic and micro-engineering laboratory dedicated to designing and crafting small series of radical concept watches by bringing together talented horological professionals that he both respects and enjoys working with.

Grant is inspired by the World War II ‘Grant Tank’ (named after Union Army General Ulysses S. Grant), with a time display on his shield and a mission to slow things down when time runs too fast. Whatever the angle, Grant’s highly polished clockwork is on full display, and you can follow every click and turn of the gears. The mainspring barrel click near his ‘belly button’ is particularly mesmerising in operation.

Like Clockwork: Always On Display

Grant transforms into three positions, each with a practical purpose.

Power Of Three: Grant Can Transform Into Three Positions

Position 1: Grant’s torso folds flat in his lap with his shield/time display lying horizontal across his back. This flat position enables the time to be easily read if Grant is significantly lower than the viewers’ eyes and, in this relatively stable position, the winding key will wind the 8-day mainspring.

Position 2: Grant’s torso locks securely into place at 45 degrees, from which he transforms into a more recognisably robotic shape. In this angled position, if resting on a desk or table, the time display is easily seen whether the viewer is sitting or standing.

Position 3: Grant’s torso sits up straight at 90 degrees to his chassis, with his shield now lying vertically along his back. In this position, Grant looks most like the Mad Max warrior he sometimes longs to be (that’s AI for you) and the key will now set the time.

Grant is available in three limited editions of 50 pieces each in Nickel, Black, and Blue.

Display
Hours and minutes

Size
Dimensions:
Truck: 115 mm tall x 212 mm wide x 231 mm long
Robot: 166 mm tall x 212 mm wide x 238 mm deep

Components total: 268

Weight: 2.34 kg

Body/frame
Transformer body with three operational tracks and three positions of clock/body.
Materials: stainless steel, nickel-plated brass, palladium-plated brass.
Dome/head: mineral glass.

Engine
L’Epée in-house designed and manufactured in-line eight-day movement
Balance frequency: 2.5 Hz / 18,000 bph
Power reserve: 8 days
Components movement: 155
Jewels: 11
Incabloc shock protection system

Movement finishing: Geneva waves, anglage, polishing, sandblasting, circular and vertical graining, satin finishing.

Winding: key on right hand doubles as weapon and pulls out to reveal a double-depth square socket key that both sets the time and winds the movement (on the back/dial side of the clock).

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